Home In Disarray

August 23, 2016

Custardy Sous Vide Crustless Jar Quiches

Sous vide jar quiche
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Whoa nelly, that is a mouthful.  It has been hot in the Seattle area.  Hotter than most of us are equipped to deal with. With many stretches of days in the 90s, the idea of turning on the oven, and frankly even using the stove has been far from appealing.  I have set up shop on our covered back deck and doing the vast majority of my cooking out there. We have a little plug-in induction burner that I’ve been using extensively.  We also have the Weber grill and my somewhat ghetto fabulous styrofoam cooler lined with a black trash bag that I’ve been doing sous vide cooks in.  It’s super efficient so we’re using a lot less power to cook stuff.  As is my true summer style, I’ve been slacking pretty phenomenal at avoiding meal planning, and that has resulted in pretty sad improvised dinners and lots and lots of breakfast sandwiches (I haven’t told you about the new chickens yet, but we’ll get there).

I really needed to get back on the wagon and start pretending to be a grown up who is actually capable of managing their own life and feeding themselves and their family, so I came up with a meal plan for the week. One of my favorite make-ahead breakfast items is quiche.  Crustless if I’m being lazy or otherwise avoiding extra carbs.  Unfortunately, part of making quiche involves turning the oven on. Sometime last year I read post about making personal sized cheesecakes in jars.  Makes sense, you use a water bath to regulate the temp of cheesecake in the oven anyway.  I imagine that you’d get an even more even perfectly silky texture with a sous vide style water bath.  That got my wheels turning and I decided to try my hand at making personal size crustless quiches in the water bath, and damnit, they are fantastic! They are creamy and custardy (totally set) but not dry or runny.

Sous vide jar quiche

Sous Vide Crustless Quiches (Ingredients for one, easy to scale)

Equipment:

  • Sous Vide temperature controller, immersion circulator, etc
  • 1/2 pint wide mouth jars
  • immersion blender (useful but not necessary)

Ingredients (per quiche – if you have a calculator or basic math skills, scaling up is pretty easy)

  • 22g frozen broccoli florets, defrosted & drained
  • 27g mushrooms, sautéed (just a few slices)
  • 15g shredded cheddar cheese
  • 1 slice thick cut bacon, fried then chopped
  • 1 large egg
  • 30g heavy cream
  • salt & pepper to taste

Instructions:

  • Prep your jars – for easy cleanup, spray or rub with a neutral oil of some sort.  This isn’t necessary though.
  • Portion out broccoli, mushrooms, cheese, and bacon into each jar.  Everything can be capped and refrigerated for up to 3 days at this point if you’re not going to have the time to do your cook right away.  My poor little Anova has a heck of a time getting my water bath up to 172F, so I did this on separate nights.
  • Preheat your water bath to 172 degrees.  While it is heating, crack your egg(s) and add in cream.  I made a batch of 6 quiches, so used 6 eggs and 180g heavy cream.  Add salt and pepper to taste.  Either whisk thoroughly or just blitz it for a few seconds with your immersion blender. The IB will give you a more consistent texture.
  • Divide your egg mixture evenly among all jars and cap them.  You want to tighten the lid finger tight.  Firm but not so firm that extraneous air can’t escape.  If  you’ve ever canned anything, think that tight.
  • Place your jars in the water bath at 172 degrees F.  Bubbles will likely escape as they sink.  If they don’t sink, let them float and cook.  No harm no foul. Cook for 1-2 hours.  Remove from bath.  To do this, I use my canning jar grabber, and with the depth of this bath, I also use a dishwashing glove so I don’t burn my hand.  Verify that your egg mixture is set.  I tilted my jars to pour off the water that’s accumulated on the lids and keep an eye on the filling to see what it does.
  • Allow to cool for 15 minutes on a towel on the kitchen counter, then transfer to a bowl with ice water to cool more.  Refrigerate overnight.
  • I imagine that these are actually pasteurized and as such would last some time in the fridge, but since I am no scientist, and frankly, they’re delicious, mine aren’t going to last all that long.  Safe refrigerated for a week.

Sous vide jar quiche

Nutritional Breakdown if that matters to you:

Per Quiche:

320 calories

25g fat

4g carbohydrates

2g fiber

16g protein

Posted in: Food, Low Carb, Paleo, Sous Vide